Apple Music In IOS 10: Refined In Both Look And Feel

To find the best budget phones, we started by reading the roundups and reviews published on general tech sites such as CNET, The Verge, and Wired. Having zeroed in on potential contenders, we went a level deeper to more technical sites like AnandTech and Ars Technica and enthusiast sites such as Android Central and Android Police. These product reviews often creep into thousands of words, giving us plenty of information with which to narrow our testing selections.

From our research and our years of experience with Android phones, we know that the quality of the screen is very important but varies wildly independent of resolution. Many budget phones now have 1920×1080 screens, but qualities such as viewing angles and color accuracy can mean the difference between an okay phone and a great one. A budget phone today should have at least a decent 720p screen.

As with any smartphone, a budget phone’s software can have a big impact on how pleasant it is to use. Some manufacturers insist on cluttering a phone with obtrusive overlays and crappy preinstalled apps that slow down the device and often look less refined than stock Android. Many of these apps are included only because the app creators paid the phone maker to preinstall them. This practice helps subsidize costs for the phone maker, but you shouldn’t have to declutter your phone right after you buy it. Worse, you can’t remove some bloatware at all—only disable it. And the slower hardware used in budget smartphones can make a heavy UI skin even more annoying. Overall, the closer to stock Android software a phone gets and the fewer preinstalled apps a phone has, the more likely we are to recommend it.

We eliminated phones that don’t look likely to receive OS updates or security patches from their makers. Some companies are better than others at providing such updates, and others barely support their phones at all. For example, Google and Samsung issue monthly security updates, but Motorola has had problems getting updates out in a timely manner. Other makers are worse. Android 8.0 (Nougat) launched late last year, so a new phone should be running 7.0 by now, or at least be scheduled to get an update soon.

Inside, most budget phones use a midrange system-on-a-chip (SoC). Each phone we recommend is fast enough to handle Android 7.0 and to perform basic tasks such as email, Web browsing, and media playback. Gaming might bog down some of the slower chips, but RAM is more important in this regard: There’s a big difference in performance between budget phones that have 2 GB of RAM or more and those that have only 1 GB. You don’t need to spend much more to get 2 GB in phones that offer it, and it’s worth that extra cost.

Some cheaper phones have only 8 GB of storage for apps, photos, music, and everything else—but because that storage also holds the operating system and preloaded apps, you end up with only a few gigabytes free. This restriction makes a microSD-card slot essential on any phone with 16 GB of storage or less.

If a good phone camera is important to you, the options are limited when it comes to budget smartphones. Even high-end Android phone cameras sometimes struggle, and the further down you go, the worse things get. Some budget-phone cameras do okay outdoors or in bright light, but you should move beyond budget phones if you want a device that can replace your point-and-shoot camera.

As mentioned above, most budget devices are carrier-unlocked, so you can use them on any compatible carrier. For this feature to be meaningful, however, it’s important for the phone to support 3G and 4G bands on the right carriers: You will have plenty of plan options when you buy one of these phones, but mostly on GSM networks with LTE support such as AT&T, T-Mobile, some regional carriers, and the MVNOs that use those networks. (Sprint and Verizon are picky about registering unlocked phones for their aging 2G/3G CDMA networks if the phones were purchased elsewhere, so your options are more limited with those carriers.) Being on a GSM network offers you the most freedom to take advantage of budget phones. The Moto G5 and Moto E4 are compatible with both GSM and CDMA networks, so they’ll work on all major US carriers.

We didn’t consider iOS smartphones for this guide. The cheapest iPhone is the 32 GB iPhone SE for $400, but it has a tiny 4-inch screen and a two-year-old processor. You can sometimes find carrier-locked versions on sale for cheaper if you prefer iOS, but all things being equal our Android picks deliver more value for the money.

Source : https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-budget-android-phone/

Thank You for Visiting My Website 100% Bonus Payoneer photo payoneer.jpg' width='100' height='60' title='Payoneer' alt='Payoneer' border='none' />

</a> 





                  <div id=
The Best Budget Android Phones
[LIMITED STOCK!] Related eBay Products